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Manufacturers Index - Howe Safety Appliance Co.

Howe Safety Appliance Co.
Granite City, IL, U.S.A.
Manufacturer Class: Wood Working Machinery

History
Last Modified: Sep 12 2017 9:27PM by Jeff_Joslin
If you have information to add to this entry, please contact the Site Historian.

The Howe Safety Appliance Co. was established about 1914 by A. F. "Frank" Howe. How manufactured a jointer guard and a tablesaw guard.

Information Sources

  • Article on the jointer guard in the December 1913 Safety Engineering. The manufacturer is not mentioned and it seems likely that Frank Howe was preparing to launch his company but had not yet registered a name.
  • Ad and article on the tablesaw guard in the December 1917 Safety Engineering.

    HOWE IMPROVED SAW GUARD

    With the unusual conditions caused by the war the conservation and protection of our industrial forces is of paramount importance to every employer.

    The Howe Safety Appliance Co. Granite City, Ill., is placing on the market a Safety Saw Guard applicable for rip or buzz saws. This guard is substantially constructed of aluminum with arms of steel and stands of cast iron. It is so constructed as to afford the workman complete protection from the saw hazard. This company also specializes in the manufacture of jointer and planer guards, swing or cut-off saw guards and carries as well a general line of safety appliances for hazardous machinery.

    The Howe Company has prepared an illustrated booklet which describes in detail the automatic action and principle of its products which will be forwarded on request.

  • Text ad in 1920-08-02 National Safety News: "Howe Safety Appliance Co. / Manufacturers and Designers of Automatic Safety Appliances / Granite City, Illinois, U. S. A."
  • October 1920 , in an article on the Milwaukee Safety Exhibit.
    The Howe Safety Appliance Company of Granite City had one of the most notable displays, showing various types of aluminum saw guards, also a motor-driven emery stand with the motor in the base. There was a Morse silent chain drive, equipped with a patented bearing, the cap of which sits on two wedges, so that as the bearing shows wear it is possible to back the wedges up and draw the cap down to fit, thus maintaining perfect alignment of the shaft at all times, 18" wheels being carried at each end of a 4’ shaft. This type of machine cuts out 75% of emery wheel dressing and saves about 30% of wheels. The same type of machine was also shown belt driven, the wire guards enclosing the belt being fabricated by spot welding instead of bolts and nuts. A 36” saw guard was also shown.
  • We learned of the Howe patent jointer guard in an owwm.org forum post.